IBI transforms Huntington’s Disease ward at a London hospital

The beautifully refurbished Wolfson Ward at the Royal Hospital for Neuro-disability has been re-opened to patients living with Huntington’s disease.

Date

July 4, 2014

LONDON – The beautifully refurbished Wolfson Ward at the Royal Hospital for Neuro-disability has been re-opened to patients living with Huntington’s disease.

Designed by architects at IBI Nightingale, the curative and enriching environment is influenced by healthcare research and the changing seasons. The ward has been opened up to create a spacious, colourful, light and sensory therapy space for 14 inpatients who are completely dependent on carers for 24-hour assistance, with many confined to wheelchairs.

Creating a homely and calming atmosphere, IBI has applied colours, textures and vary-tone lighting based on the changing seasons to help patients make connections with the past and the present and feel a greater sense of belonging.

This theme is reflected by the inclusion of an indoor garden room that looks out onto an external courtyard garden, where patients can pot plants and carry out holistic therapies. This has proven to enhance the quality of life for people living with Huntington’s, according to research by the hospital.

“By blurring the boundaries between the inside and outside, a more warm and inviting atmosphere has been created in the ward,” said Lynn Lindley, Senior Interior Designer at IBI Nightingale.

Because people living with Huntington’s are prone to changes in mood, the design features two completely different therapy spaces: a contemplative and relaxing lounge area that includes a built-in fish-tank and sensory room, and a bright, stimulating multi-use area that encourages therapeutic engagement and social interaction.

“We involved IBI Nightingale in our initial workshop and we can see how it influenced their designs,” said Geoff Day Head of Estates at the hospital. “But it’s not just the architecture – that level of detail is evident everywhere. IBI truly understood the importance of bringing light, colour and texture to our ward.”

The Royal Hospital for Neuro-disability was founded in 1854, and is the oldest independent hospital and medical charity in the UK. The hospital is famed for its specialist therapies, working with profoundly disabled adults with acquired brain injuries, as well as degenerative neurological conditions such as Huntington’s disease and multiple sclerosis.


Contact
Katie Endicott, Media Relations
+44 1273 560920

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